Wednesday, January 25, 2017

Lions Subhi, Tejas arrive in Katraj zoo

Lions Subhi, Tejas arrive in Katraj zooThe Pune Municipal Corporation (PMC) has announced the arrival of two Asiatic lions in the Rajiv Gandhi Zoological Park and Research Centre at Katraj.

Rajendra Jagtap, additional municipal commissioner, PMC, said, “We got a pair of lions from Gujarat’s Sakkarbaug Zoological Park, and have already started constructing cages for them. It will take around a month to finish the work and accommodate them.”

Rajkumar Jadhav, director of the Rajiv Gandhi Zoo, shared, “They have minor injuries and are in quarantine as required when animals are transported in the zoo. The minor injuries are only those which may ordinarily occur in transportation in cages. Both have completed five years of age. We will open them for public display after a month.” The pair is named Tejas and Subhi by the Sakkarbaug zoological officials. The feeding cost of each lion is around Rs 25,000 per month.
http://punemirror.indiatimes.com/pune/civic/lions-subhi-tejas-arrive-in-katraj-zoo/articleshow/56765471.cms

Bay hosts ‘Lion Personality’ lecture

Jan 23, 2017
ESCANABA — Bay College’s Math Science Division presents a special colloquia by Anna Viau titled Lion Personality: An Indicator of Success? The free presentation will be at 4 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 26, in room 125 of the Math Science Building. The presentation can be seen live via iTV at 3 p.m. Central Time in room 107 of Bay College’s West Campus in Iron Mountain.
Viau, a former Bay student and supplemental instruction leader, is a recent graduate of the Royal Veterinary College in London, UK, with her master’s degree in wild animal biology. Her professional interests focus on large predators and their relationships with the environment. Born and raised in Delta County, her goals are to bring the knowledge and skills she gained overseas to the unique ecosystems of the Upper Peninsula.
During her studies, Viau conducted research into the personalities and behavior of the Asiatic lions at London Zoo. Asiatic lions (Panthera leo persica) are a distinct subspecies of lion found only in Gujarat, India. Asiatic lions are an endangered species, with the official population count in 2015 numbering them at just over 500 individuals. With a population of this size, and only a limited number in zoos, captive animal research is essential for the continued persistence of this species.
Previous research has demonstrated that animal personality is measurable and can be assessed in various taxa, including mammals, fish, and insects. Originally, these studies focused on using animals as models for human personality. However, the progression of animal personality research has allowed for a novel approach to welfare concerns, conservation issues, and reintroduction success of many animal species.
Her project involved assessing the responses of the lions to new physical and social environments, including the introduction of a new lion to the group and the construction of a new enclosure. This study provided an example of how personality research facilitates more individual-based management, which may help to maximize the welfare and overall success of captive collections. In her talk, Anna will discuss the design, results, and implications of her research, and provide a glimpse into life as a student in Europe.
http://www.dailypress.net/news/community/2017/01/bay-hosts-lion-personality-lecture/

2 rusty spotted cats for 2 Asiatic lions: Zoos not interested in Borivli national park’s offer

mumbai Updated: Jan 24, 2017 15:44 IST
Badri Chatterjee
Badri Chatterjee
Hindustan Times
Highlight Story

The Sanjay Gandhi National Park lost its oldest lioness Shobha (12) (in pic)in 2014, brought from Benerghatta National Park, Bengaluru in 2009. A male lion, Ravindra, aged 12, who was brought along with Shobha, is currently the eldest lion at SGNP.(File)Three months after the Sanjay Gandhi National Park (SGNP) in Borivli, Mumbai’s only national park, sent a proposal to various wildlife sanctuaries, zoos and national parks in India to trade its rusty spotted cats with two lions, the park officials are yet to get any response.


The SGNP had planned to exchange two of their six captive rusty spotted cats -- world’s smallest cat living in the wild -- for two Asiatic lions.
The SGNP officials in October 2016 reached out to wildlife sanctuaries and national parks in Hyderabad, Bangalore, the central, state zoo authorities and the Gir Forest National Park in Gujarat in a bid to increase the population of lions at the park.
“We have not received a positive response from any of the national parks yet, including Gir. It seems that they don’t have Asiatic lions to spare at the moment,” said Anwar Ahmed, chief conservator of forest, SGNP. “We are still trying to speak to forest officers from Gir and hope their stand changes.”
Sources from the Gir National Park, on condition of anonymity, said the exchange of a rusty spotted cat cannot be an equivalent for an Asiatic lion. “Some more species of the same animal or maybe a more valuable species is required for the exchange,” said a forest official.
Jespa and Gopa, the two lions at the SGNP lion safari (File)
Currently ,the SGNP’s lion safari, spread across 12 hectares, has three captive lions – two males and one female. While one of the males is old, the other two are siblings. Ahmed said the idea was to increase the lion population at SGNP as inbreeding is not permitted. “As inbreeding leads to a number of genetic diseases, we wanted to introduce new genes and increase the lion population by bringing lions from other sanctuaries,” he said.
The request for lions was in light of the state forest department’s intention to increase the forest cover and maintain its wildlife through a number of revamp programmes, especially for the SGNP. In July last year, the park managed to get two eight-year-old female captive Royal Bengal tigresses from Pench Tiger Reserve, Maharashtra.
Meanwhile, officials from the state zoo authority (SZA) said the central zoo authority (CZA) had compliance issues with SGNP, but why other sanctuaries were disinterested needed to be examined. “The CZA officials had an objection with the proposal, as they first wanted SGNP’s revamp plans to be cleared by them. However, we will have to see why there have been no takers from other zoos, national parks, as there is no clear indication from them yet,” said Sanjay Thakre, chief conservator of forest, SZA.
Lion safari at SGNP
The Sanjay Gandhi National Park lost its oldest lioness Shobha (12) in 2014, brought from Benerghatta National Park, Bengaluru in 2009. A male lion, Ravindra, aged 12, who was brought along with Shobha, is currently the eldest lion at SGNP.
Shobha, who died of a prolonged illness, had mothered three cubs –Jespa, Gopal and Little Shobha – along with her mate Badshah (died of old age in 2013). While Jespa and Gopal are the other two lions currently living at SGNP, Little Shobha died soon after their birth in 2012.
 
http://www.hindustantimes.com/mumbai-news/2-rusty-spotted-cats-for-2-asiatic-lions-zoos-not-interested-in-borivli-national-park-s-offer/story-Ruj7KaVxYLvFk7MMhJjSNO.html

Bird flu scare delays arrival of anacondas, Asiatic lion to Mysuru zoo

Lion panel against bypassing people’s sentiments


Representative image.Representative image.

| Jan 18, 2017, 06.00 AM IST
AHMEDABAD: A parliamentary committee, which is visiting Gir for two days from Tuesday, believes that translocating lions from Gujarat should not be done overruling sentiments of local people in Saurashtra, who have helped to conserve the Asiatic lions in their last abode.

The members of the 31-member science and technology and environment and forests committee, headed by Renuka Chowdhury, Congress Rajya Sabha member, strongly believes that lions were well conserved in Gujarat and their population was also increasing.

Sources said that members who had attended the meeting on Tuesday had told them informally that the committee may recommend that the lion translocation project to Kuno-Palpur should be reconsidered keeping in view sentiments of the local people and opposition from Gujarat forest department.
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/ahmedabad/lion-panel-against-bypassing-peoples-sentiments/articleshow/56633334.cms

‘Must study habitat, food base before translocation’



| | Updated: Jan 19, 2017, 05.43 AM IST
AHMEDABAD: The 31-member parliamentary standing committee on science and technology and environment and forests, along with its chairperson Renuka Chowdhury, concluded its two-day visit to Gir forest on Wednesday.

Regarding translocation of lions to Madhya Pradesh, Chowdhury said that proper studies must be completed before shifting the big cats.

Interestingly, her statement runs counter to the view of the Supreme Court-appointed 12-member expert committee which recently said that lion translocation and IUCN studies can take place simultaneously. Gujarat, however, has opposed the move and demanded that the studies be completed before shifting the lions.

It may be recalled that in April 2013 the apex court had ordered translocation of the Asiatic lions from Gir to Kuno-Palpur.

During its two-day visit, the committee headed by Chowdhury also held meetings with civic societies and NGOs in the area. Talking to TOI, Chowdhury said that the people of Gujarat are against shifting of the lions.

"Translocation of the any big cat can have dangerous consequences if they are shifted without any proper studies," she said.

There are 523 lions in Gir forest spread over an area of 20,000 sq km in Saurashtra region.

"A situation should not arise where the animal is killed because they pose danger to the local habitat. One has to study the availability of food, the habitat in the area where it is to be shifted, and the behavior of the species to be shifted," she said.

Chowdhury further said that before shifting any animal, one has to understand the area and its climate and see if the animal would survive in the new habitat.

"Look at what happened to the Humboldt Penguins in Mumbai Zoo. These penguins were brought without proper studies," Chowdhury said.

It may be recalled that eight penguins were brought to Mumbai from a South Korean aquarium on July 26 last year. Of the female penguins, one named Dory died in October following a brief illness.

 http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/ahmedabad/must-study-habitat-food-base-before-translocation/articleshow/56653363.cms

Lion panel against bypassing people’s sentiments


Representative image.Representative image.

| Jan 18, 2017, 06.00 AM IST
AHMEDABAD: A parliamentary committee, which is visiting Gir for two days from Tuesday, believes that translocating lions from Gujarat should not be done overruling sentiments of local people in Saurashtra, who have helped to conserve the Asiatic lions in their last abode.

The members of the 31-member science and technology and environment and forests committee, headed by Renuka Chowdhury, Congress Rajya Sabha member, strongly believes that lions were well conserved in Gujarat and their population was also increasing.

Sources said that members who had attended the meeting on Tuesday had told them informally that the committee may recommend that the lion translocation project to Kuno-Palpur should be reconsidered keeping in view sentiments of the local people and opposition from Gujarat forest department.
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/ahmedabad/lion-panel-against-bypassing-peoples-sentiments/articleshow/56633334.cms

Lions may get their share in Budget


Lion.Lion.

| | Jan 18, 2017, 09.19 AM IST
AHMEDABAD: For the first time after 1972, when the king of the jungle had been dethroned from its position as national animal by the Royal Bengal Tiger, a joint committee of the parliament has decided to give the Asiatic lion its due respect and conceive a separate 'Project Lion' in the lines of 'Project Tiger'. The committee has recommended that fund allocation for the king of the jungle should not be a piecemeal exercise any more. The committee, which is on a week long tour of Gujarat, will submit their recommendations before the Union budget is published this year.

After the lion lost its status as the national animal, for four decades, little funds came forth for its conservation, while 'Project Tiger' stole the show, and conservation funds.

But on Tuesday, the joint committee including Lok Sabha
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/ahmedabad/lions-may-get-their-share-in-budget/articleshow/56633303.cms